Hypnotherapy

Within science, there is no debate as to whether hypnosis exists or works. Science simply cannot agree on what it is and how it works, although as The British Society of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis states:
“In therapy, hypnosis usually involves the person experiencing a sense of deep relaxation with their attention narrowed down, and focused on appropriate suggestions made by the therapist.”
These suggestions help people make positive changes within themselves. Long gone are the days when hypnosis was seen as waving watches and controlling people’s minds. In a hypnotherapy session you are always in control and you are not made to do anything. It is generally accepted that all hypnosis is ultimately self-hypnosis. A hypnotist merely helps to facilitate your experience – hypnotherapy is not about being made to do things, in fact it is the opposite, it is about empowerment. If someone tells you they can hypnotise you to do something, ask them to hypnotise you to rob a bank, and when they can’t, ask them to stop making ridiculous claims.
The following four extracts from Dr Hilary Jones’ book, “Doctor, What’s the Alternative?”, provide an accurate and accessible wonderful description of what hypnotherapy is, how it works and how hypnotherapy can help you change and grow.

Definition of hypnotherapy

Contrary to popular belief, hypnosis is not a state of deep sleep. It does involve the induction of a trance-like condition, but when in it, the patient is actually in an enhanced state of awareness, concentrating entirely on the hypnotist’s voice. In this state, the conscious mind is suppressed and the subconscious mind is revealed.
The therapist is able to suggest ideas, concepts and lifestyle adaptations to the patient, the seeds of which become firmly planted.
The practice of promoting healing or positive development in any way is known as hypnotherapy. As such, hypnotherapy is a kind of psychotherapy. Hypnotherapy aims to re-programme patterns of behaviour within the mind, enabling irrational fears, phobias, negative thoughts and suppressed emotions to be overcome. As the body is released from conscious control during the relaxed trance-like state of hypnosis, breathing becomes slower and deeper, the pulse rate drops and the metabolic rate falls. Similar changes along nervous pathways and hormonal channels enable the sensation of pain to become less acute, and the awareness of unpleasant symptoms, such as nausea or indigestion, to be alleviated.

From June 2012 AB Counselling will be offering Cold Laser Treatments from a team of qualified Laser Technicians to help clients deal with the cravings often associated with nicotine withdrawl. This is a stand alone treatment or it can be incorporated within stop smoking hypnosis sessions. For further information on how it works and the benefits of this exceptional treatment please visit http//www.thorlaser.com/smoking/index.php

Related articles:
How Hypnosis Works – articles on how hypnosis works for all sorts of problems
Hypnotherapy works for bowel pain – BBC news article on hypnosis for IBS
Dr Hilary Jones, “Doctor, What’s the Alternative?” Hodder and Stoughton: London (1988)

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